3 Ways To Remove Stains And Burnt Food From Pots And Pans Leave a comment


cleaning pans

We’ve all put a pot or pan on the stove, looked away for a moment too long, and discovered a burnt mess that proves nigh impossible to remove. While there’s no getting around the frustration associated with these incidents, there’s no need to fret, because there is more than one way to banish the mess and return your pans to their original glory!

Today I’ll be sharing my 3 trustiest methods for removing stains, residue, and burnt food from pots and pans. I’ll also share a few additional tips that will help you prevent such messes from reoccurring in the future.

3 Ways To Remove Stains And Burnt Food From Pots And Pans

cleaning pans

1. Bar Keepers Friend & Scrub Daddy

Bar Keepers Friend is one of the best options out there for cleaning stubborn messes off of cookware, including stainless steel, anodized aluminum, enameled cast iron, and copper. (It works well on Pyrex bakeware too!)

Sprinkle some of the powder onto a wet Scrub Daddy, then scrub the stained or scorched area in a circular motion. The mess should start breaking up shortly, but if it doesn’t, let it sit for about a minute before trying again. Once you pot or pan is clean, wash it with warm, soapy water and rinse well.

cleaning pans

2. Dishwasher Detergent Tab

Dishwasher detergent tabs—the ones made of compacted detergent powder, not the dissolvable liquid packs—act like an all-in-one cleaning agent and scrubber. The gritty powder helps scour through messes while the detergent breaks down grease and food residues.

To use it, just add some hot water to the stained pot or pan, dip the detergent tab into the water, and scrub. With a bit of elbow grease and determination, your cookware will be gleaming in no time.

cleaning pans

3. Baking Soda & Hydrogen Peroxide

And last, but certainly not least, is one of my all-time favorite cleaning duos, baking soda and hydrogen peroxide. If you always have these on hand like I do, this is a great option to keep in your back pocket.

To use them together to clean pots or pans, mix a bit of both together to form a paste, then smear it over the mess and allow it to sit for about 20 minutes before scrubbing. Soon enough, your pot or pan should be good as new. (And keep in mind that when using baking soda and hydrogen peroxide, the longer you can let them sit, the less scrubbing you’ll typically need to do.)

cleaning pans

Bonus Tips For Cleaning Cookware

  • Wear cleaning gloves when using any of the methods described above. These cleaning agents can be harsh on skin, so it’s important to protect your hands.
  • Cookware is easier to clean when it’s still a bit warm, so the sooner you can get it in the sink and get some dish soap on it, the less likely it is to harden into a mess that will be difficult to remove.
  • Be thorough when you hand wash your pots and pans. Always scrub the bottom of your cookware, as well as the area where the handle meets the body, even if they don’t look that dirty to you.
  • Whenever a pan develops a dark crust from cooking, set the pot or pan back on the range when you’re done with it, add enough water to cover the stains, and add a small amount of dish soap. This will prevent the residue from drying onto the pan so that it’s easier to clean up later.

Notes About Cleaning Nonstick And Cast Iron Cookware

If you need to clean a burnt mess out of a nonstick or cast iron pot or pan, ignore all the advice in this post. Both nonstick and cast iron are different animals entirely and require different approaches to cleaning and care. But not to fear—you can learn everything you need to know about cleaning and caring for both nonstick and cast iron pans at the links below!

Read More: 11 Ways You’re Ruining Your Nonstick Pans

Read More: How To Clean Cast Iron Cookware The Right Way

Do you have any tips or tricks for cleaning cookware?



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